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's trip and whether this economy is going to go up. tomorrow, a lookat numbers you don't really quite see all the . melissa: i'm melissa francis and here's what's "money" tonight of the as we speak setting themselves up for a run on the bank. cypriot banks closed until next tuesday. people are scrambling to get as much as they can from atms. should you be worried about your money in the bank right now? we'll we'll find out from today's power panel. plus billionaire's take on the pulse of the economy and consumers. landry's is one of the country's largest estaurant and gammably companies. he is here to tell us where he sees the biggest headwinds and opportunities right now. >>> call it the anti-student loan. investors will pay school costs for a piece of student's future income. isn't that interesting? can this help solve the student debt crisis? the ceo behind it will explain this break through because even when they say it is a not it is always about money melissa: first today's market moment. the bulls are back in the driver's seat. the fed says its policy to stimulate the economy will
-sixth of the economy in order to be able to gain control of our lives, and of course it's going to be a mess. what does the government do that is good when it starts interfering with our lives? there are functions for the government. they need to remember what those things are and leave the rest of us alone. >> neil: what they discovered, as you warned -- this is prior to your prayer breakfast meet and greet with the president -- that all of a sudden the goodies would be showcased up front. the problems would be later. the goodies were fewer, the problems many more, and the cost of this potentially much, much hire than the thought. how is all of this rolling out now? >> well, of course the reason that it was done in secret, rather than in a transparent manner in which it was supposed to have been done, is because there are so many bad parts of it. there's so many obligations so many new taxes associated with it. it's incredibly expense simple. it was supposed to lower the cost. it has raised the cost of the premiums for average family, and in the neighborhood of $5,000. this is a disaster. and the real
. >>> not even a down economy can crush rock and roll. legendary kiss rockers gene simmons and paul stanley kick off a big expan shun of their restaurants. they're here in first on fox interview to tell us why now is the time to bet on the consumer. even when they say it's not it is always about money melissa: first let's turn to today's market moment. fears over cyprus's bailout led to a choppy day of trading on wall street. the dow managed to eke out a slight gain with the nasdaq and s&p 500 posting minor laws. the s&p fell for the third straight session. that is the worst losing streak of the year. microsoft could be in some hot water with the justice department. microsoft and some of its business partners are being investigated over a foreign bribery claims. government officials in china, italy and romania were allegedly bribed to earn software contracts but shares of microsoft still managed to close the day up slightly. >>> all right we start tonight in cyprus. the parliament rejected the tax on bank deposits, potentially killing the bailout but russia is floating another option, gazprom, w
economy. its banks are not highly connected with the rest of the international financial system. there is no risk of contagion here. >> adam, actually, of all the ideas you laid out, which do you think is the least bad of all those solutions? is it going ahead and letting the banks fail? >> that would be my preferred route. failure implies that the banks can't pay their depositors. they are restructuring. they will be very orderly. basically, the banks would be closed for two days. what would come out is when they reopen, the depositors would be the large depositors because the small depositors would be fully protected. the large depositors would be the owners of a bank and they would have deposits of somewhere between 50 1k3 60 or 70% of their money and the rest of the shares in the new bank. the banks would be solvent. the banks could be highly capitalized and they would then have access to the ecb for refinancing to provide any liquidity. >> and the fallout from that would be that the russians -- >> and basically -- >> the fallout for that is that the russians are the ones wh
bernanke will keep printing to bail out barack obama's weak economy. and print as many yen as it takes to bail out japan. the markets truly love it. europe is the odd man out. they've given ultimatum to cyprus, no bailout if you can't get it together by next tuesday. here is something else to get you fired up. cyprus wants to nationallize y payshun money. "varney & company" is about to begin. [ cows moo ] [ sizzling ] more rain... [ thunder rumbles ] ♪ [ male announcer ] when the world moves... futureses move first. learn futures from experienced pros with dedicated chats and daily live webinars. and trade with papermoney to test-drive the market. ♪ all on thinkorswim. from td ameritrade. all on thinkorswim. all stations come over to mithis is for real this time. step seven point two one two. rify and lock. command is locked. five seconds. three, two, one. standing by for capture. the most innovative software on the planet... dragon is captured. is connecting today's leading companies to places beyond it. siemens. answers. >> thursday, march 21st. m headline today, ben bernanke
the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. with investment information, risks, fees and expenses ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. neil: government officials say they want to clean up the tax code. to make a very serious point, the government is looking at a uniform internet tax. when we were told would never happen. on top of the other taxes that we were told would never happen. this federal internet tax, i am telling you, get ready for it. it i coming soon. charles payne and melissa francis they do not expect it to stay at the levels for long. it is here, the question is whether europe starts low and high. >> you are right, it opens the gate to that. but it makes you very nervous. one of the things about buying online is that a lot of the ti
this. gallup, fox news, rasmussen, after the economy, the number two concern to the people is the debt. i think there is a growing sense that government spending and government debt at these levels, it does act as a huge drag on the economy. connell: what we have been saying here, unless the interest rates start to go up, you can pull people and they can say whatever they want. their behavior will not change unless you see a spike in interest rates. >> it will be hard to get a spike in interest rates with the fed flooding the system with liquidity. the whole world is on painkillers right now. we have become addicted to liquidity, easy solutions and until the fed start to bring it in and interest rates go up, i do not see a change. dagen: do the people who are still buying taxable debt, you start to see money flowing back into u.s. stock. you see billions every week into world stock. >> i think we are somewhere close to the end of a bond bubble. for the third time in 60 years, we are looking at ten year treasury rates below inflation. that is, obviously, not a way to build over time. we
really suffered greatly throughout this week, as we noted. the economy in cyprus, is going to continue to drop. 10 to 20% is likely. this is a country that was glowerrishing before -- fluorishing before it joined eurozone, but now cyprus is taking a hair cut for greece, and greece for cyprus, and the troika is coming in to help. you cannot just jump out at this time. yet there is no room for nail failure, they are not printing more money, they will severe draconian measured. severe austerity, one country at a time, in the meantime people are weeping, imagine everything you have known to be true, is not true any more. neil: if you think about it, ty. you are a big investor, and world renounce, a lot of folks in europe, their bank acount is everything, their savings are there their vestments are in glorifies pass book savings accounts, that is it. so a trust has been broken to say nothing of the trust in european club, to keep it going. i think when you let people down, when you scare them, when you break a trust of confidence it is really katie bar the door, isn't it? >> i don't think t
and the new fed forecast for the economy. and the stocks we're focused on this morning, blackberry getting an upgrade at morgan stanley and a note titled why it won't go down and it gets into the best buy bull camp, and calling it the best near-term idea in the sector. let's get straight to fedex. the package delivery company says it earned $1.23 a share in the fiscal third quarter and below wall street forecasts. fedex says the customers were choosing slower transit services. this does happen, of course, after a massive run in the transports. >> one of the things that amazes me about fedex is they keep missing and they get loved a few days later. missed and gets loved. it's still regarded as being a profit machine. they have this restructuring that people like very much. people feel it's only a matter of time before someone steps up to the more expensive freight. to me, my charitable trust owns ups. ups has the expectations lower. scott davis always says negative things. >> melissa hit the nail on the head. the stock had a big run and the two guys were going head to head over what was in
when the economy is struggling? >> i agree 100% with you. there is no creativity at all. >> like the show even more all the time. [laughter] neil: thank you, guys. thank you very much. in the meantime, what is jimmy fallon getting that has a guy named mitch saying my goodness [inaudible] >> keep up the good work. >> thank you. neil: if jim fallon does get "the tonight show" and it does come to new york, the joke ultimately could be on businesses already in new york. because andrew cuomo's new budget would give this show a huge tax break for moving into the big apple. other companies are saying, hello, what about us, we have been struggling in the big apple and have not left the big apple. we have been supporting the big apple. why not give us a break for sustaining the big apple? sporting-goods ceo mitch mundell is one of them would he think. >> i applaud the governor. it's going to create jobs. it is all about job creation. you know better than everyone. >> it will bring people to new york, hire more people for the hotels and restaurants. >> i think he will be tremendous. at th
when the economy is struggling? >> i agree 100% with you. there is no creativity at all. >> i like the show even more all the time. [laughter] neil: thank you, guys. thank you very much. in the meantime, what is jimmy fallon getting that has a guy named mitch saying my goodness look, if you have copd like me, you know it can be hard to breathe, and how that feels. copd includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema. spiriva helps control my copd symptoms by keeping my airways openor 24 hours. plus, it reduces copd flare-ups. spiriva is the only once-daily inhaled copd maintenance treatment that does both. spiriva handihaler tiotropium bromide inhalation powder does not replace fast-acting inhalers for sudden symptoms. tell your doctor if you have kidney problems, glaucoma, trouble urinating, or an enlarged prostate. these may worsen with spiriva. discuss all medicines you take, even eye drops. stop taking spiriva and seek immediate medical help if your breathing suddenly worsens, your throat or tongue swells, u get hives, vision changes or eye pain, or problems passing urine. other side
insolvent. the banks in cyprus are huge, eight times the size of the economy. consider that here in the united states. our banking system is roughly one-time the size of our economy. what we're waiting to see next are they going to get this through parliament and get it done? it is so controversial they're trying to find out different ways to make it less controversial. impose the tax on larger shareholders to a much greater degree. it was originally 9.9% and you go to 12%. if you didn't want to tax the small guys at all you'd have to go to 15% or 16%. this is the scene when the president walked into the palace headquarters. there were people there with no written on their hand and this says merkel stole our money. keep in mind, european union will still give them 10 billion euros and they were trying to come up to reduce the original size from 17 billion euros. the other thing to keep in mind, by taxing depositors they're taxing a lot of foreigners and a lot of russians who had kept their money. the thing is will the rest of europe, will small depositors across the rest of europ
and howard ward. >> economy is getting better, capital chase returns and stocks continue to trend higher although there's profit taking here and there. >> okay. we'll take that to the bank. the key question about europe. it's all about credit quality. >> who do we have to worry about? >> spanish, italian and greece. >> you're very worried. >> people have to start doing their work. europe never did the work of fixing bank solvency in the first place. >> gentlemen, thank you for being here. >> happy monday. >> that does it for us today. make sure you join us tomorrow. right now it's time for "squawk on the street." ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >>> welcome to the last week of the first quarter. good morning. welcome to "squawk on the street." i'm carl quintanilla with melissa lee and jim kraker. futures reflecting the relief of the cyprus deal. a similar picture in europe where the italian tenure is now below where it was before those italian elections and a mixed picture in asia this morning. the nikkei up about 1.5%. the road map begin with the eurozone that did not collapse over the weekend so natura
the people who otherwise woif brought a business into new york. to make the economy grow, you need inbound migration, not outbound migration. neil: it's a dollar's choice for you; right? i mean, you could go to north dakota, but north dakota's pretty far from here, so you go to florida? obviously, a lot of people do. there's no income tax, no estate tax, but a lot of peep don't like the heat. i'm just saying, you know, maybe people are looking at this wilbur saying there's a lot of high tax states. california is one of them. new york is one of them. tristate, new york city, new jersey, connecticut area, all high tax states. where do we go? that's what politicians count on. >> my guess is he'll be in the sense to bring in more tax than he will lose. i don't think you're going to have vast outbound migration, but i think the question is, did you break safe with the business community when you promise them the temporary tax, people sported it. i don't know very few people in the business community opposed it the first time because we thought, well, he's doing a good job. he's trying to fix it
the day. from the economy to earnings now. we get a number of interesting quarterly reports due today as well. before the bell, we'll hear from fedex, general mills and lennar and this afternoon we have oracle. a lot to chew on for the markets. s&p by the way coming off its first three-day decline of 2013. take a look at u.s. equity futures at this hour. green arrows across the board. and then of course there's cyprus. the country's leaders are holding crisis talks today trying it avert a financial meltdown. the parliament rejected an unprecedented tax on bank deposits. that was a key part of the eu bailout terms. the finance minister is in moscow today with mounting speculation that russia could step in with a safety plan to safeguard russian deposits in cyprus. steve sedgwick is in moscow where he caught up with the finance minister there an hour or so ago. steve? >> they turned to russians once again. there's a loan on the table from russians dating back from 2011 so it's not the exception to it the rule for the cypriots to turn to the russians. the russians themselves are indignan
. let's take a pause to digest all of what's going on. >> there are two economies here. kb homes, lennar, sherwin williams, whirlpool. there is the economy defined by fedex, by caterpillar and this morning by yorele cal. i was on the call last night. the cisco downgrade today. this dichotomy is allowing i think bernanke to not have to taper off. at the same time it calls into question how weak is that international market. seems very weak. >> did we get largely what we wanted from the fed yesterday? there were no big surprises within that. >> no. i think that was the point to not have any big surprises. i think there was a poignant moment yesterday that i think wasn't talked about enough where someone asked imputedly, i felt, because ben bernanke deserves better -- do you know anybody that's unemployed? do you note price of a gallon of milk? he came back, yes, i have a relative on unemployment. he's going to get unemployment down then we'll talk about tapering. until then we are playing a parlor game with the fed. i believe bernanke when he says these things. >> there's no reason to beli
? and your h're not seeing it-- >> the moving service economy which unions have. >> go ahead, adam. >> charlie was making an interesting point and i think i can help him here because the deal you said earlier, why why don't unions give in to the weight of the private sector employees have given in. well, the fact of the matter is. a lot of people watching this understand that. those benefits aren't very good sometimes so i don't fault the union leadership for saying-- >> private sector on everything from health care, to-- >> and we don't want our members to-- >> well, guys, here let me finish. a thousand jobs, a thousand workers, the private sector guys getting screwed for the jobs or you could have a hundred guys getting lavish benefits because that's all the company can afford. >> and what about the numbers, charles. >> what we're forgetting that we as taxpayers fund at least in the case of the public union members, their benefits. their incredibly generous benefits compared to ours. we're paying for them. we fork over the money and pay the bills. and i think that's the a distinc
to the forefront and that's more important. the u.s. economy, china and although there is a big idea they're stealing customer's money and savings accounts is abomination, i believe it's a different european country. entered the european union in 2008, i don't think it will be as big of a deal as people think, i think it will be on the headlines for two weeks. stuart: all right, let's see what's happening on the opening bell, upside. and i'm looking for a gain of 20, 30 points for the time they're open, 10 points higher, 14,462. nicole, let's bring you in. one of your favorite stocks, we're watching it closely. yoga pants, they say they're too sheer. in other words, you can see through them. i think that the stock is way down. nicole: it is way down. it's going to hurt their bottom line. and they're talking about bringing in the pants that are sheer. that basically is like a fall for the company, you can't have pants that are sheer. i have to admit my lululemon, i noticed recently is sheer and it's no joke and you're able to bring them back in, but it's going to hurt their revenue and bot
records, taking, and larryeating bails glazer from the economy summit. and bruce is in pennsylvania where the snow has begun. reporter: well, neil, that heavy snow from this morning has turn into light snow this afternoon and now more of a freezing rain. literally minutes ago the sun made an appears and that is rare. no blizzard here but another significant snowfall. two or throw inches around most of the region, now a slushy mess. it began this morning. we expect it will not wrap up until late tonight. this is actually the 11th day in the month of march with some kind of trace amount of snow or more. none of them any big deal but all of them irritating. last month, one day with a trace of snow. temperatures much colder this march. the average high 15 degrees colder this march than last march, and just two days in the entire month of march that the national weather service would regard as clear, day where the sun was actually out. a fair number of fender benders this morning, but overall more of a slushy mess than a real danger. the temperatures are expected to get down near freezing, so
of the economy that are not that strong and i don't know what the sequester will bring in the month of april. >> look, the data say things are better, and i think the fed will be under a lot of pressure because interest rates are headed higher. >> at some point the fed will have to acknowledge that -- and they have -- to your point, they changed the language a little bit. it's a moderate recovery and it's a strengthening recovery. words like that. >> right. >> at some point they're going to have to acknowledge what we all seem to know which is -- they're not great, but things are getting better. now will inflation pick up and that, of course, is the fed's number one mandate. will inflation pick up until we see jobs pick up because wage inflation comes with excess demand from workers. i don't know. that's the big trillion dollar question mark. >> commodity inflation whether it be corn or copper and the strong dollar will contain inflation that's going up a great deal. housing is stabilizing and not really in the numbers. i want to take issue with some of what you said. i think we all think th
's on -- you know, it's 0.2% of their economy and, you know, we're worried about whether there's any ripple all the way over to us. >> it may want be an instant market reaction, though. it may be something that's more of a concern about whether there would be other countries that step out of the eu. >> don't you think the markets could anticipate whether there would be further trouble or not? >> i don't know. i think this is -- >> we would be seeing it if it was really -- if they he can't sell off in europe, we shouldn't be looking at it at all for our markets here. >> no. michelle, what's that? >> i know you're over there, but you don't care. >> the one ripple effect i can think of is -- the one ripple effect i can think of is that if when they wind down this bank, there's some wealthy russians or wealthy companies that had money in there that they would lose a substantial portion of, perhaps 50% of the uninsured deposits if they do a wind down. if they have a margin call, you know what i'm saying? some kind of ripple effect maybe related to a russian company or a russian individual. but when
that the eurozone crisis may be impacting that region's biggest economy. crude fell 1.1% settling, $92.45 a barrel. sandra: miners outperforming as gold ends the session higher, still above the $1600 mark which everybody is watching im gold and newmont mining, barrick gold, kinross, all top performers up, between two and 4%. adam: you like banks? financial sector feeling the squeeze again as the turmoil in cypress continues to play out without a resolution. goldman sachs and morgan stanley, they led the declines. sandra: who needs a wallet? the mobile payment industry is one of the fastest growing areas in tech. $171 billion. we're telling you how to add some cash it your portfolio by investing in this cashless trend. adam: we've got new data out showing more consumers are cutting the chord and saying good-bye to pay it. v services. time warner, are you listening? does the trend mean you should say good-bye to cable stocks? a top on lift tells us which names will feel the pain and which ones will ride this trend to cash success. "after the bell" starts right now. sandra: first we'll tell you what
of the economy is about 18 billion euros, so the banking industry is four times the size of the economy. if you allow the banks to fail, much like letting citibank or jpmorgan here in the united states, that would have significant repercussion the in the economy. connell: where do you stand on the idea of the con cement spreading? could it happen in other countries was the question asked, it seemed like, in the markets this morning if it goes through on cypress, on to the next guy and next who have problems? >> that's a legitimate concern that the architect or one of the principle architects here, the imf, the ecb, and the european union and germany with a strong hand there. if they force this upon one country, who is to say they couldn't force it upon a larger, more important country? if europe were able to execute a plan like that, who is to say that the united states wouldn't look and say, well, they did it in europe, why couldn't we look here? connell: rule of law question; right? >> exactly. dagen: what's the solution? somewhere between forcing the haircut and letting banks fail? where is
to do it this way, as for 2014, i thi it depends on the circumstances in the economy. if there is more obama fatigue. lou: can i say, watching the republican party with all prevail -- tre veil, i think that everyone better give up on idea of doing anything with the democrats and letting the economy doing the intellectual heavy lifting for the republican party, they better get ready to go. because, this is not going to be a default election, just as 2012 was. i have to -- i hate to do it, but we have to right there. anyway, thank yo thank you very, that is it for us, we hope you will be us tomorrow, congressman frank wolf of join us. on what is going on in the obama justice department, from new york. york. >> you know every liberal's dream that government seizing your money out right, there is nothing you can do about it. now no cyprus they could find out the hard way, this tiny island nation sent a tsunami shockwave to the rest of the world, keeping the banks closed until they find a more palatable way to. welcome i am neil cavuto, you got 10 grand in a bank account. how about waking
go, the economy comes to lif norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. david: five seconds away. s&p futures are closing let's head back to tim mulholland in the pits of the cme. what are you see, tim? >> we're closing near the highs. slow volume day. next week is the first week of the -- last weeks of the first quarter. so i think that we're looking at some regional fed manufacturing indexes, and end of the quarter. this market sits back a little, one step back, two steps forward. david: everyone wants to it is friday. everybody take a breath. tim, thanks very much. >> sure. shibani: shares of grocery conglomerate supervalu are soaring today. let's head back to the floor of the new york stock exchange and sandra smith with the latest. sandra? >> hey, david, hey, shibani. investors of supervalu the supermarket chain are breathing a fresh air as the stock is trading over 15 million shares. the basically the grocery store chain announced it closed a many could plex deal where cerberus capital management led group slimmed down the supermarket portfolio of this company. they sh
can be the linchpin in our economy over here. it's ridiculous. >> right. it should be a smaller problem. they could take care of this in other ways. they could print money or -- >> i'm not going to pick a state here. it would probably be a southern state, but a poor southern state cannot take the down the united states. >> a western state because they're not awake yet. but here we are. out of the 22 -- cyprus? >> you thought greece was small, cyprus is -- >> come on, cypriots? i remember some conflicts. i thought it was a golf course, which would be a much bigger problem to me. >> let's introduce our guest host this morning, kenny dichter, co-founder of avian. why do i always mispronounce it? because you've been b drinking it. >> avione is airplane in french and spanish. >> can we get a full shot of this? he's now the chairman of juicepress. i have been drinking this stuff for the past week, virtually, five days. >> and you know what? your skin tone has never looked better. >> no food up until this saturday. you've been doing this now -- >> 22 days. >> i've made my cleanse zero
crude prices can tell us about the broader economy. stick around. ♪ ♪ no two people have the same financial goals. pnc works with you to understand yours and help plan for your retirement. visit a branch or call now for your personal retirement review. at a hertz expressrent kiosk, you can rent a car without a reservation... and without a line. now that's a fast car. it's just another way you'll be traveling at the speed of hertz. all stations come over to mithis is for real this time. step seven point two one two. verify and lock. command is locked. five seconds. three, two, one. standing by for capture. the most innovative software on the planet... dragon is captured. is connecting today's leading companies to places beyond it. siemens. answers. >>> good morning. welcome back to "squawk box" here on cnbc. i'm joe kernen along with becky quick and andrew ross sorkin. u.s. equity futures at this hour after giving back about 62, well off the lows yesterday. indicated that a bounce a little, but a time can happen between thou and 9:30 on the east coast. there's energy, you see crude
, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. with investment information, risks, fees and expenses today is gonna be an important day for us. you ready? we wanna be our brother's keeper. what's number two we wanna do? bring it up to 90 decatherms. how bout ya, joe? let's go ahead and bring it online. attention on site, attention on site. now starting unit nine. some of the world's cleanest gas turbines are now powering some of america's biggest cities. siemens. answers. it's delicious. so now we've turned her toffee into a business. my goal was to take an idea and make it happen. i'm janet long and i formed my toffee company through legalzoom. never really thought i would make money doing what i love. [ robert ] we created legalzoom to help people start their business and launch their dreams. go to legalzoom.com today and make your business dream a
underlying economy as long as we stay in the free market and let people go out earn money and change the world, we'll come out ahead, a third of the billionaires reside in u.s., there is a reason, we have that free market capitalism that animallistic spirit, that bridges our country ahead of the game not some government interference or program. neil: well, i hope you are right, monica, in the meantime the government is crowding out the capital, right? it is maybe we've gotten used to that. it is like beating your head against the wall, when you stop, you still have a gaping wound but you feel better. i'm wondering whether we have a false assurance here? >> i don't feel like i have any kind of assure answer from anyone, both of the budgets not only house democratic budget but republican budget are asking for very contentiousesques one wants to us get rid of obamacare, that was a big struggle and the other wants to us get rid of the sequester cuts, which we've been haranging about for weeks now. neil: that just wastes time, every time they do that and add to more spending, we keep talk
, competitiveness issue, to our national and state and local budgets, and to our economy. >> as for the law's implementation, the bulk of the taxes are in effect. the benefits and mandates kick in next year. tracy? tracy: clearly, already seeing effects. cvsments you on the scale and tell them how fat you are. you talked about the debt ceiling, what did he say about that? >> i did. one of the next fights comeing up here, we could expect to hit the ceiling this summer in august. he says we're not going to agree to raise the debt ceiling without doing something about entitlements. mcconnell says this brings the president to the table so republicans want an equal number of cuts or more cuts than whatever amount they agreed to raise the debt ceiling by. mcconnell says it's got to come from entitlements because you can't do enough of what we've seen so far, discretionary spending. tracy: they want us off the beach in the summer. we'll have another debt ceiling fight, be here in august sweating it out again. >> yeah, can't wait. tracy: i know, me too. rich, take the vacation now, thanks. >> yeah.
capital economy will flea to lower tax states. >> we have the right to change the rules op you after the fact, and that's what's nos fair. >> some in sacramento are trying to unwind this. california's not cypress, it's not taking, but to many, it is clearly unfair. >> no, it is. it is so unfair. i mean, changing the rules after the fact is crazy. william thank you for the report. >> you bet. >> well, in the mean time, a huge win if you're one who likes to resell things from ebay to yard sales, and itch ed -- rich edson in washington. rich? >> e bay and overstock.com love the decision. publishers, not so much. the supreme court questioned whether a student could buy cheaper, foreign made and sold textbooks and resell them in the united states for profit. copyrights permits sales only overseas, but the courts said no. once americans buy an item, they buy and resell it of the the other decision could have made it difficult to resell foreign items in the u.s.. libraries say the decision is a landmark win for consumers, small businesses, online marketplaces, retailers, and libraries natio
'll have a long-lasting impact on our economy. we've been dealing with a lousy europe for a long time. but you'll have this pullback at 5 percent which is about 1484 and 7% at 53, i might consider getting back in, but i'm not doing it until then. cheryl: looks like europe doesn't have a plan, obvious. let's go to the nymex, jeffrey grossman. jeff, let's talk about the oil contract. one of things we saw today again was the safety of the u.s. dollar. you had traders around the world jumping into the dollar. your take. >> today was really a dream come true in many respects. we walked in this morning, the dollar was very strong, took our market down right to the support level. 91.75 and spot crude was a major support level on the way down. the minute the dollar weakened, came off those highs a little bit, market rallied right pack to where the resistance levels are which is in the high 93.85 to $94 level. it's behaving like a normal market really with a little input that came in from the european information here, but the truth of the matter is this is a market that still, again, is a sal
of the labor pool, you know, i think -- i think it makes a lot more sense that the economy is not growing. all we're doing is spending more money for the things that we buy and so it's a charade, a facade. looks like we're growing, but we're contracting. i think that's going to get worse as time goes on. shibani: fueled by money printing. peter, always great to have you on. thank you very much for joining us today. >> you're welcome. shibani: switching gears and giving lou dobbs a chance of this. if the tiny med trainian island collapses, does it take the entire eurozone with it? i saw you taking notes. i know you want to jump in here, thouts on what peter said? >> peter, i always enjoy listening to his perspective on the world. he said that cypress, you know, could happen anywhere. he did later acknowledge it was an extreme example of banking and sovereignty gone wrong. here's the reality. cypress is now learning that it made serious mistakes. it tried to take the eurozone, the european commission, the inrnational monetary fund and the e. cb to the brink. they play ad like fools. that's how t
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long has been considered generous because new york's economy and demographic contours different from those the rest of the country. there is a country growing more diverse and independent as income and inequality sigh rockets, more americans find themselves working low wage service jobs, looking more and more like new york. many of the political problems we are grappling with, immigration, minimum wage, what the repost-recession economy should look like, policy, policing, are issues at the center of new york's mayoral race. my great pleasure to have with me four of the democratic candidates for mayor of the new york city, bill de blasio. sal albanese, former city councilman. bill thompson, former new york comptroller and nominee for mayor in 2009. john liu, current city comptroller. we reached out to christine quinn who is also running but could not join us today. gentlemen, thank you very much for being here. >> thank you. >> this trial, i think, is -- really explosive. and i thinks that really changed the contours the politics on this issue. i'm curious what your feeling is about w
is your final four. the economy versus policy and fundamentals versus market. the policy in washington, d.c. and the economy which you could argue is getting better. >> it will be an amazing face-off. you mentioned harvard and cyprus. it has been a sweet 16 weeks for the stock market. that is a record unbeaten since 1989. cyprus this week halted that rally. we are seeing better job growth here. take a look. that's a cluster that is taking in, it will cost us 750,000 jobs this year. connell: the big interrupter, we have another good day today for the stock market. do you think washington can still upset at? >> i do. as we look at some of the other brackets, we are getting into the pre-announcement season for earnings. we have a number of positive valuations. when you look at just 1% earnings growth and those numbers being revised lower, hard to see the market. connell: you are worried, specifically about what type of a pullback. make your case. >> i think we are very close to that pullback. i think what we will see is it is maybe not the drivers that we are used to or we heard about over t
. cheryl: ideal economic environment, you're looking at the economy even though we had kind of a mixed picture today and then, again, corporate valuations. that's the bulls' side of this. john, i know you're bearish. you're calling for serious corrections on the s&p and dow. you're saying it's going to happen sooner rather than later. what are you seeing on the other side of the coin here? >> well, look, when things are euphoric, which they are, when alan greenspan comes out and says pie stocks along with the movie stars and, of course, our good friend, ned, then you should be looking to sell. and i'd also like to say this, i was on the show here last april 2012, we were pounding the table then, but right now you've got some real headwinds, and i'll give you a few of them. one, gdp is benign, .1%, you know, in fourth quarter of 2012. analyzed numbers are running around 2%, it just isn't keeping up. unfortunately, the treasury market is not confirming here. you know, if the ten-year was at 275, i'd say we'd probably leg up here, not happening. you know, and i think, thirdly, look at ear
. a market and economy dependent, i guess, but absolutely, they're going to keep printing until they feel they don't have to anymore which is probably a long time away from now. charles: buying the dips, thanks a lot, larry. that's by the way the opening bell, and the markets are ringing, the futures have been up all morning long and let's check the big board. dow up 29 points and ticking away. and the market is up and fedex we talk about that being something of a proxy for the economy. and they reported the numbers this morning and the profits were lower, and maybe people are buying or not shipping as much of the certainly we want to find out what's going on. let's go to nicole petallides on the floor the of the new york stock exchange. >> we're seeing fedex to the down side and the transportation index is higher and the dow is up 51 points. fedex comes out here with the numbers and they talk about weakness that hit their profits and they're actually trying to cut costs, but in cutting costs they actually incur cost toss cut costs so they're noting that as well. and year to date, fedex i
, there will have to be budget cuts behind the sequester. the sequester will not be the end of it, but the economy is recovering. i wouldn't say in spite of what the govern am hment has done. the economy is recovering of its own natural forces now. we've had 12 years of subpar growth. we've had 12 years of up and down with little net progress in the markets and people have forgotten what a strong economy and what a bull market -- a secular bull market looks like, and i think that's generally where we're headed for the next four years, so i'm predicting, as you said, 25,000 on the dow which implies a 15% compound rate of return for the next four years. >> john, can i just come back on the important points that you're making about europe. i'm not sure it's a question of what america trades with whom. it's a question of where the companies that are quoted on this market make their profits and in technology, for example, 40% of those profits are made in europe and therefore europe arguably is more significant than you might think on the trade argument having said that. this is a very interesting week
♪ ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. >> it's an ipo. it's marin software. the ceo will be on the show later. what do they do? if you hire them, you're a company and they'll make sure that your profile on the internet pops up first when you do a google search. marin software just opened up 41%. now this. >> on what grounds do you-- >> because i predicted that you would not have filled out a ncaa bracket. connell: agree on that. imus: i he see in front of you-- >> what does a man know about basketball when he thinks that duke is going to win? you think that the plumly brothers, miles, mason and marshall would be my guy working for the louisville guys. and beat kansas in the final, 84-82? >> varney is reading this. connell: no he's not, no he's not. stuart: that was on imus yesterday and bracket picks. did you think i convinced anybody i know anything about basketball? >> no. stuart: i new about the plumly brothers and i went on to say i wish we could go back to the days of the fab five from michigan and tim
and other nations, think it is too soon to suggest that. it is the banking system the size of this economy, you talk about the fact that large percentage of the deposit are outside attempting to trick the nation and the bank in the unique way. i sure hope they backpedal on insurance deposits, that would provide a little bit of stability and i hope they suggest this is not something we're looking to do broadly across the euro zone nations. melissa: do you think they will do that, or do you think the opposite, that other people follow suit? this is really unprecedented. they're basically skimming people's bank accounts. >> i agree with both of you, which is always a good thing to do. the fact is they will try to reassure people this is a one off thing. they have rung the spell. now people know especially larger depositors know if they're in italy or spain they could be hit by this. the one thing we have not mentioned is russia. love those large deposits are from russians. including those who had taken the money. the fact they're taking a haircut is not anything people want to cry tears over,
the letter, fearing high-tech investors who helped build the venture capital economy will flee to lower tax states. >> the game is rigged. you can't possibly win because we have the right to change the rules after the fact. that is what is not fair. >> governor jerry brown is reviewing the situation. now these taxpayers can request a waiver if you will, david, hoping that the governor, lawmakers hammer out a deal. if no not, no reprieve, taxman comes, 120 million going to the state from about 3,000 people who thought they were helping small business. david? david: it can happen here. it is happening here in california! william la jeunesse. thanks, man. >>> disney world turning some kids away at the park gates. that story when we go "off the desk" in a just a couple minutes. ♪ your finances can't manage themselves, but that doesn't mean they won't try. bring all your finances togeth with the help of the one person who can, a certified financial planner professional. cfp -- let's make a plan. ♪ [ male announcer ] help brazil reduce its overall reliance on foreign imports th the launch of
popping up. that is what i worry about the u.s. economies. where are those bold innovative companies. and i would make another footnote about the buybacks. yes, record numbers since 2009. but that is because the feds are buying back their own shares. they say let them pass the stress test. they really struggle and diluted earnings per share. diluted their capital base with a lot of shares during the crisis. they have basically flooded the market to recapitalize and buying it back. the. neil: in cyprus explodes and banks reopened, let's see what happens to the residents of cyprus. people say oh, we are there for you. then you realize that they say d write. the rest are iphone. gerri willis will be back on monday. thank you for joining us. lou: god evening, everybody. presidenobama wrapping up his middle eastern tour with a stop in jordan today. a nation wracked with turmoil as syrian refugees are pouring across the border, fleeing the violence being inflicted by the bashar al-assad regime. president obama expressing frustration with those who question the president about why the unite
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